Guest Writer: “How Are You Managing Your Stress and Overwork?”

Article by: Judy L. Buka MED., LSW
Comprehensive Counseling Services, Inc.

As a therapist who works in a small business, a special interest of mine has been how to keep rising stress levels down.  Trying to run the business, build it and concentrate on its growth and success can be overwhelming especially for small business owners and individuals who run, or own, their company.

A recent study of 2,500 American workers by CareerBuilder.com found that 77 percent feel burned out at their jobs!

“So what,” you might ask? It’s no secret that stress is a fact of daily life, and in fast-moving cultures with technology thrusting us to new heights, what else is new?

Well, some things we may not think about are, for example, that if the stress is ignored in a workplace, rising stress levels can actually affect the atmosphere and relationships between coworkers by affecting employee behavior. Under strain and stress, for example, managers sometimes lash out at their employees, become overbearing and can create a hostile workplace. Companies pair down their workforce to remain competitive and increase the demands on themselves and each other. Small business owners especially feel this pressure, as they try to do all they can to keep costs down.

Effective communication in the workplace is essential in management and leadership. Constructive communication is essential for effective functioning. Lack of effective communication skills can create disconnect and destructive dynamics. Look at your own situation and try to figure out what you can do to eliminate stress both at the workplace and at home.

Here are some areas of workplace stress to be examined and perhaps modified for a more relaxing day!

1. Environment and Organizing Your Environment:

-Is your workspace being kept orderly?
-Do you and your staff have all of the papers, materials, equipment, and tools you need at hand.
-Are they easy to find and organized in a way that is convenient for all to use?
-Remember that a constant need to look for or find needed papers and materials can cause frustration, overwhelm and increase stress.
-Time spent looking for materials is time taken away from accomplishing things in a timely fashion.

2. Distractions:

Do you find that you are interrupted a lot during the day to return phone calls or look at and answer e-mails? Are there people dropping in with constant interruptions?
-Try to reduce distractions!!
-Set up specific times during the day to check e-mails and return phone calls.
-Set up hours when others can ask you questions or when your door will be open for them. When you are trying to get things done, stress is lowered when your attention is not diverted to other things or people.

3. Time Management:

A considerable amount of office stress results from allocating too much time to less important things or working on what is in front of you, rather than what is important. You end up then, facing a rapidly approaching deadline on an important project and experience stress and pressure.
-Prioritize important projects and schedule them accordingly. Daily “to do” lists help clarify time frames.

4. Delegating Responsibility:

Small business owners and executive directors often try to do too much. It is a trap into which many fall.
-Try to delegate tasks to others competent to do them.
-Learn to say “no” and only bite off what you can chew.

5. Balance:

Small business and non-profit people have a personal stake in their financial future and in the success of the business or organization. However, make certain you have some time every day that is free from the pressing concerns of your business.  Make sure you take adequate breaks to get away from work. Take a walk outside, go have some coffee or read a magazine as a small break.

6. Avoid Unrealistic Expectations:

Stress and the feeling of failure come from feeling that you are not meeting your expectations or someone else’s expectations.
-The solution is to set realistic goals for yourself and your employees. Expecting too much in too short a period of time sets the stage for stress, anxiety and, eventually, burnout.
– When offering your services to others, it’s often best to promise less than you can deliver and then deliver more than you promised!

7. Get Sleep!:

Stress is greatly increased by trying to work if you’re too tired.  Make sure you are getting sufficient sleep. Set a bed time and stick to it!

8. Look at the Substances You Take In!:

Caffeine, nicotine and alcohol all boost stress levels.
-Replace coffee and soda with water or non-caffeinated beverages.
-Quit smoking and encourage your employees to do so, too. Moderate your alcohol consumption.

9. Eat Healthy

Eat low fat proteins, vegetables and fruit daily. Be careful not to skip meals.
-Eating smaller meals throughout the day can relieve stress and is better for your metabolism.
-Eating correctly and getting enough exercise will make you feel better. You will release endorphins, which will reduce stress and help keep your blood pressure down while boosting your immune system.

10. Deal with Employee Conflicts as They Arise:

-Create an open atmosphere where employees can discuss any problems they are having with you and try to resolve them through effective communication.
-Get help on effective communication if you have not had it.
-Festering disputes between employees will be destructive and can cause stress for everyone.
-Remove problem employees who create negativity or hostility in the office at once.
And remember, effective communication is the key to a harmonious atmosphere.

Judy L. Buka M.ED., LSW is licensed by the Marriage and Family Counselor and Social Work Board, and offers counseling, for individuals, couples, and groups.

Groups (small and confidential) available for stress reduction, and small business owner support.
Groups are 2 hours $35 per session.
Contact Judy for more information: 513-891-1533
Also workshops available on effective communication!

Judy L. Buka M.ED., LSW
Comprehensive Counseling Services Inc.
10999 Reed Hartman Highway Suite #233
Blue Ash, Ohio 45242
513-891-1533
http://www.bcounseling.org/

——–

This article was featured in our monthly newsletter, Bridgeworks Connect.
To read the whole newsletter, follow this link.
Join our monthly email list.

Advertisements

Operation Happiness: Non-Profit Employees

How to keep your non-profit’s employees happy with all the changes and belt-tightening that seems to be across the board is a challenge. Harvard Business School reported that job satisfaction nationwide is at a 23-year low and that’s not just with non-profits. Chronicle Survey says that 40% of workers characterized themselves as dissatisfied with their jobs. That means, if you have 10-20 people with your organization, 4-8 of them are probably unhappy.

This dissatisfaction can be attributed to a number of things, though. The Chronicle of Philanthropy hosted an online discussion recently with Jan Masaoka, the Chief Executive of the California Association of Nonprofits and, previously, with Blue Avocado, and Trish Tchume, the National Director of Young Nonprofit Professionals Network. They took questions from readers and also posed some of their own, answering them with their many years of experience.

The first question was “What is employees’ #1 dissatisfaction?” The responses centered mostly around transparency of procedure. It would depend on who was being asked, but a large complaint is not necessarily that employees want to be in on the decision-making process, but that they are unclear about what the process is. In non-profits and many other agencies and organizations, there are formal and informal hierarchies. Decisions are often made through the unofficial hierarchies and employees need clarity on how the organization is structured in this area as much as the formal processes which would be written in the handbook. Jan stated, “Too many non-profits (and for-profits) emit messages like ‘we do everything as a team’ that people read as indications that the non-profit is a democracy. It’s important to be able to say, ‘This is a decision that you will have input on, but the decision will be made by X.'” According to Daniel Pink, people are motivated by three things: autonomy, mastery and purpose. Give your people these things and they will thrive.

Another topic brought up was that of “bailing” by employees, or “organization-hopping.” People who find themselves dissatisfied with their current position or place of employment may “bail” on that organization if they are confident they can get another job at the same pay or see themselves as marketable. This brings up another point: How long does a person need to stay at position/organization in order to be seen as a dependable/loyal person? There is a statistic that leaders of younger generations have about 8-10 transitions over the course of their career as opposed to far fewer in previous generations. However, this can be misleading because while younger leaders may change organizations, they are often staying within the same cause.

No turnover can equal stale ideas. Some organizations and positions expect a certain amount of turnover in staff. Some are meant to turn over every year or two. For example, you would not want a 35% turnover in management positions, but having a high rate of turnover for youth workers on a playground is expected and acceptable. Employers should be seeking ways to build into their employees not only for their current job, but also for any jobs they may have in the future.

One other question was on effective methods in getting good problem-solving input from staff. Jan and Trish suggest that good problem-solving cannot happen when there is widespread distrust. But if there is a general attitude of “we can work things out,” then having teams prioritizes their own work is the best way to start. Check out an online resource: Structuring Leadership: Alternative Models for Distributing Power and Decision-Making.

To read the full discussion, visit the website.

——–

This article was featured in our monthly newsletter, Bridgeworks Connect.
To read the whole newsletter, follow this link.
Join our monthly email list.

%d bloggers like this: