Facebook Page Cover Photos for Non-Profits

If you’re a Facebook user, you probably understand by now that Facebook management has a habit of making changes. Most recently was the complete remaking of Facebook profiles to the new Timeline layout. Rather than keeping posts in a “news feed” set-up, entries, comments, photos are organized along a timeline, unique to each person. Not only this, but now only one photo is featured on each profile, known as the Cover Photo.

Facebook Timeline is now moving on to Facebook Pages and the clock is ticking.  For now, your organization can preview what the page will look like in the Timeline layout, but all Facebook Pages will convert automatically to the new layout on March 30, 2012.

As you prepare for these changes, be sure to put a lot of thought in the Cover Photo for your page. If you use Facebook for a lot of your marketing, as more and more organizations are doing, the Cover Photo will be the first thing visitors will see when landing on the page.

Here are some quick guidelines:

The size of a Cover Photo is 850 x 320 (pixels) or 4 x 1.5 (inches). The dimensions might look small on whatever editor you are using, but you can always expand it for editing purposes – just check that you are keeping the size in ratio to the ones above.

– The bottom left corner of the Cover Photo will be blocked by the Profile Picture.

Include your organization logo. If you use your logo as the profile picture, then it’s not necessary to reuse it in the Cover Photo.

Include the organization contact information: address, phone number, hours, website address. This information may not be readily available on the rest of the Page and so take a couple more clicks for visitors to get to it. Most people will not click through to other tabs on a Facebook page. Take advantage of the Cover Photo’s position and size to get that information across.

– Above all, choose a photo that encapsulates what your organization is. It can be a photo of the building, but even better, an action shot of a program or volunteer.

Again, these changes will take place automatically on March 30th, 2012, so you might as well be prepared and switch to the new layout early.

Let us know when you have switched over and we’ll check out your new look!
————————–
This article was featured in the March 2012 issue of our monthly newsletter, CDP Press.
To read the whole newsletter, follow this link.
Sign up today to have it delivered to your inbox!

Advertisements

Critical Skills in Fundraising

Here are some critical skills to get under your belt when going out to raise funds for your organization.

Getting the Appointment Over the Phone 

It is very important that you meet with potential donors in person. To get this accomplished, though, you first must master the art of making the appointment.  Get a script together and practice on your own and then with another person (someone who will give you quality critique).

Phone Objections 

There are certain objections that always come up when asking people for donations:

– I’m not interested in giving.
– I already give to other organizations.
– I already give “this” much to your organization.
– I have to check with my spouse.
– We don’t have it in our budget.
– I don’t know enough about your organization.
– How can I know you’ll spend my money wisely?

These six statements echo most concerns donors have about giving to non-profits.  The key to answering them is to be sincere, attentive and as succinct as possible.  Some objections are beyond your control and some address key structural concerns within your organization. It is vital that your organization has a transparent method for handling finances and that you are consistently looking for ways to be good stewards of the money already given to you.  Make this information easily available, whether on the organization website or in a pamphlet that can quickly be mailed to the potential donor.  Having appropriate answers before the call is placed will give you a foundation and confidence.

The Visit 

When preparing for a visit there are a lot of questions going through your mind. The big ones can be as general or specific as you need them to be. What do you say? Where do you begin? What order do I need to proceed? It goes without saying to dress and behave professionally for the person you are meeting.

Handling the Responses 

Along with the objections given over the phone, there are the typical ones given once you have met with someone in person. The first is an agreement. “Yes, I will support you at $____.” The second is refusal: “No, I will not be able to support you.” The other responses are non-committal: “I’d like to think about it.” or “That amount is too high for me right now.” Handle these responses gracefully and be prepared with an appropriate answer or follow-up to keep the conversation going.

Ask for Referrals 

There is a bottom of the barrel for every fundraiser. Don’t be afraid to ask for referrals, but be sensitive. Don’t push someone for names and numbers, but be sure to ask each person you approach if they know of anyone else who might be interested in donating to your organization.

Storytelling 

Storytelling is immensely important in fundraising these days. Share an account of someone who has given to your organization, a person on staff, a volunteer, or someone whose life was impacted by a service at the organization. A good story engages the listener and reaches into their hearts.  Insert stories into these meetings, committee meetings, a newsletter, email, Facebook and thank-you letters. For more on storytelling, check out this entry on our blog.

————————–
This article was featured in the February 2012 issue of our monthly newsletter, CDP Press.
To read the whole newsletter, follow this link.
Sign up today to have it delivered to your inbox!

Pinterest and Non-Profits

The latest online craze is Pinterest.com, an online “Favorites” place for individuals to share with others the things they love and which inspire them. Users can share anything from cooking recipes to decorating ideas to fashion to quotes to movies to travel destinations to the completely random.

It works like a pinboard, where you would pull ads, notices, coupons or pictures out of a magazine or newspaper and tack it for reference later. Pinterest boards can be personalized to theme and taste.

Pinterest is great for personal use, but non-profits can also take advantage of it. For animal shelters, it can be a great way to showcase some of the lovable animals awaiting adoption. If your non-profit sells certain goods to raise money, like jewelry, handcrafts, etc, share on your own Pinterest board. The possibilities are endless!

*Note: At this time, you must be invited to use Pinterest. You can be invited by a current user or by Pinterest itself, but you’ll be put on a waiting list which could take a couple days. Accounts are connected to an email address and can be linked with a Facebook profile.

Prospective Board Members and the Right Questions

When the time comes to look for new board members, there are a couple strategies you can take.  You could meet up with the prospective member one-on-one, or with another current member, for coffee. Or you could come at it from another angle.

Put together profiles of several potentials and bring them to a board meeting.  Then, all together, sort the individuals into 3 groups.

Group A – Candidates who are well-known by the board and can be added immediately if the initial meeting goes well.
Group B – Candidates are not well-known, but if there is mutual interest, membership can be pursued.
Group C – The candidate doesn’t seem like the right fit, but depending on who accepts or declines the offer, they can be moved up to Group B.

Having the right questions ready, too, can make all the difference. Here are some great ones to keep in mind.

For yourself:

What can this person do for us? Don’t only think about who the person is, but what benefit would they be to your board. For example, you might want a certain person on your board because you believe they can connect you to a certain part of the community. Don’t assume they can, but ask them if they think they could.

For the individual:

  • What interests you about our organization? Which aspect interests you the most?
  • What are some of your previous volunteer experiences and leadership roles?
  • What appeals to you about board services as a volunteer activity?
  • If you were to join this board, are there any experiences you would like to have or people you would like to meet?
  • What skills, connections, resources and expertise do you have to offer or are willing to use for the organization?
  • Do you have any worries about joining the board?
  • Is there anything you think you would need to make this experience a successful one for you?
  • If fundraising is an important aspect for your board, clearly state the expectations you would have for the individual and ask if they think it feasible.

The candidate may have questions of their own before agreeing to join your organization’s board. Here are some that you should be prepared for.

  • Why are you interested in me as a board member?
  • What role do you see me playing on your board?
  • What are your expectations and commitments?
  • What is unique about your organizations? Your board?
  • Are there particular discussions this board has difficulty handling?
  • What weaknesses are there in the way the board works together and with staff?
  • What are the major issues this board is facing? How are you addressing them now?
  • If I were to join this board, what would you want me to do during my first year?
  • If I were to join this board, what could I reasonably expect to get out of this experience?

For more, check out the full article on Blue Avocado.

————————–
This article was featured in the January 2012 issue of our monthly newsletter, CDP Press.
To read the whole newsletter, follow this link.
Sign up today to have it delivered to your inbox!

Professional Development Series

Join us Thursday, November 10, 2011 for a Professional Development Series.

We have brought together area specialists to share their expertise in issues important to you: Non-profit insurance, accounting and human resource management.  Participants will be able to register for all three sessions or for individual sessions – Space is limited.  Check below for the schedule:

  • 9am – 10am – William C Mense – Non-Profit Insurance
    United Heartland Insurance AgenciesWebsite
  • 10am – 11am – Jim Clark – CPA
    Lloyd, Darner, Guenther & Ellis – Find them on Facebook
  • 11am – 12pm – Lee Geiger – Attorney
    Graydon HeadWebsite

These sessions are designed to answer some of your important questions, such as:

  • What is Director’s and Officer’s Insurance?
  • Do I need an audit?
  • What can I say in an interview?
  • Do I need a General Liability policy for my non-profit?
  • What is a 990 and do I have to submit one to the IRS?
  • What financial statements should I provide to my Board?
  • Can I ask someone about their religious beliefs in my faith-based non-profit?

You can register for this event by calling us at 513.858.1738 or by visiting our website.

Contact us soon as space is limited!

Video: Our Clients

Check out this great video with some of our wonderful clients.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

Merry Christmas

Image via Wikipedia

We will be closed:

Christmas Eve, Friday, December 24 and

New Year’s Eve, Friday, December 31, 2010

We wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

%d bloggers like this: